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So far 64 bodies have been recovered. About 250 of the missing and dead are students from a single high school near Seoul who were on their way to the southern tourist island of Jeju.

Divers were unable for days to enter the submerged ship because of strong currents, bad weather and low visibility. Over the weekend they were able to use a new entryway through the dining hall, resulting in a jump in the discovery of corpses.

On Jindo, relatives of the missing must search white signboards giving sparse details such as gender, height, hair length and clothing to see if their loved ones have been found.

No names are listed, just the slimmest of clues about mostly young lives now lost. Many favored hoodies and track pants. One girl painted her fingernails red and toenails black. Another had braces on her teeth.

“I’m afraid to even look at the white boards,” said Lim Son-mi, 50, whose 16-year-old daughter, Park Hye-son, has not been found. “Because all the information is quite similar, whenever I look at it, my heart breaks.”

Relatives have already lined up to give DNA samples at the gymnasium where many are staying, to make bodies easier to identify when they are recovered.

A transcript released by the coast guard Sunday shows the ship, which carried 476 people, was crippled by confusion and indecision well after it began listing Wednesday.

About 30 minutes after the Sewol began tilting, a crew member repeatedly asked a marine traffic controller whether passengers would be rescued if they abandoned the ship off South Korea’s southern coast.

That followed several statements from the ship that people aboard could not move and another in which someone said it was “impossible to broadcast” instructions.

The cause of the disaster is not yet known, but prosecutors have said the ship made a sharp turn before it began to list.

The Sewol’s captain was arrested Saturday, along with one of the ship’s three helmsmen and a 25-year-old third mate. The third mate was steering at the time of the accident, in a challenging area where she had not steered before, and the captain said he was not on the bridge at the time.

Senior prosecutor Yang Jung-jin said the third mate has refused to tell investigators why she made the sharp turn.

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Kim reported from Mokpo, South Korea. Associated Press writers Foster Klug, Youkyung Lee, Jung-yoon Choi and Leon Drouin-Keith in Seoul, and Minjeong Hong in Jindo contributed to this report.