Pineda banned 10 games for pine tar, won’t appeal

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Pineda wasn’t seen with the pine tar in the first inning, when the Red Sox roughed him up. Boston manager John Farrell asked plate umpire Gerry Davis to check Pineda after two fast outs the next inning.

“I felt like it was a necessity to say something,” Farrell said. “You know, I fully respect on a cold night you’re trying to get a little bit of a grip. But when it’s that obvious, something has got to be said.”

Davis went to the mound, touched Pineda’s neck and ejected him. Pineda said no one told him to use it, that he did it “by myself.”

Earlier this month, Pineda pitched well in a 4-1 win over the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium. Television cameras showed a substance on his hand in the fourth inning - Pineda said it was dirt, not pine tar. His hand was clean in the fifth and Farrell didn’t ask for him to be checked.

Pineda said he didn’t use pine tar in a start against the Chicago Cubs, in between his Red Sox outings.

Among other suspensions of pitchers for pine tar in the past decade, Tampa Bay’s Joel Peralta was penalized eight games in 2012, the Angels’ Brendan Donnelly 10 days in 2005 and St. Louis’ Julian Tavarez 10 days in 2004. The suspensions of Donnelly and Tavarez were cut to eight days after they asked the players’ association to appeal, and Peralta dropped his challenge with no reduction.

Pineda said Thursday he didn’t feel the ball well in the first inning when he allowed two runs on four hits. And he said he wanted to be careful not to hit any batters.

“I know it’s pine tar, but the pine tar did not help me” throw harder, he said. “It helped me for feel, (get) a better grip.”

Red Sox catcher A.J. Pierzynski understood why Pineda used the pine tar.

“I don’t have a problem with guys that do it,” he said. “I know as a hitter, I want to get in there and know the guy has a grip.

“Put it on your hat, put it on your pants, your belt, put it on your glove, whatever you have to do. You just can’t do it that blatantly. That was what the biggest issue was. No one has an issue with him doing it. It’s just more of the fact that it’s so blatant.”

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