- Associated Press - Monday, April 28, 2014

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) - In a story April 23 about companies with social networks that match home cooks and diners, The Associated Press misspelled a cook’s name. She is Amber Schreiner, not Shreiner.

A corrected version of the story is below:

New social networks connect cooks and diners

New breed of peer-to-peer apps is moving the chef-diner relationship outside restaurants

By MICHAEL WARREN

Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) - If the latest development in culinary social media catches on, the trendiest restaurants may no longer be restaurants.

A growing number of apps and websites are taking the traditional chef-diner relationship out of established eateries and into private homes. Cookapp, for example, is just the latest to launch in the U.S., connecting adventurous diners with independent chefs - and even just ambitious amateur cooks - willing to host dinners at their homes and other offbeat locations.

Like its peers EatWith and Feastly, Cookapp is taking a bite from the edible side of the “shared economy,” where so-called peer-to-peer businesses are disrupting established industries and giving headaches to municipal regulators and tax collectors. Other non-food apps in this realm include Uber and Lyft, which match private drivers with people needing rides, and VRBO and Airbnb, which help people turn their homes into vacation rentals.

Cookapp, which recently moved its headquarters from Buenos Aires to New York City, works like a matchmaker, arranging intimate gourmet dinners between strangers. Chefs list when and where they will prepare particular meals; diners book what interests them, pay upfront via the app, then just show up and enjoy.

For chefs, it offers a chance to experiment without the hassle, expense and risk of maintaining a restaurant. For diners, it can be the ultimate culinary adventure.

Tomas Bermudez came up with the idea for Cookapp while living in Rio de Janeiro, where he struggled to meet people. So he and his sister hatched the Cookapp idea, then set up a website and began knocking on the doors of cooks and chefs back home in Argentina.

“We said, ‘Is it cool for you to invite people to your house whenever you want?’ And they loved it,” he said. “We proved it in Buenos Aires, so we’re thinking let’s go to New York, and if it works in New York, it works worldwide.”

Passionate cooks have long hosted open dinner parties, hoping random guests will share their joy and help with expenses. Some have even created virtual restaurants, comparable to the speakeasies that served illegal liquor during the U.S. prohibition era. In Argentina, these “puertas cerradas,” or “closed-door” restaurants, proliferated after the economy crashed in 2002, operating on a cash basis, without formal advertising or oversight.

More than 50,000 users and 650 cooks registered with Cookapp during its yearlong tryout in Argentina’s capital, and just six weeks after its New York City launch, 250 cooks and thousands of customers have signed up there. Next up, the company hopes to expand to San Francisco, followed by Boston and a host of other major U.S. cities.

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