- Associated Press - Wednesday, August 13, 2014

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) - The Kansas City Chiefs offered a preview during recent 11-on-11 training camp practices of what could be in store for unsuspecting quarterbacks this season.

Pro Bowl linebackers Tamba Hali and Justin Houston, first-round draft pick Dee Ford and fellow pass-rusher Josh Martin all trotted onto the field at the same time, leaving defensive tackle Dontari Poe as the lone down lineman in a unique scheme designed to create pressure.

Elsewhere in the NFL, similar personnel groups are known as “NASCAR packages” - the idea is that they overwhelm the opposing offense with their speed.

“We call it the ‘dog front,’” Hali said. “A bunch of dogs going after (the quarterback).”

Hali and Houston are known commodities, combining for 22 sacks despite injury issues last season. Ford was expected to be a part of the sub package. But Martin’s presence is intriguing considering he’s not yet well known.

That could change in the Chiefs’ “dog front.”

“He’s very fast,” Hali said. “He’s very quick off the ball. He’s very strong, much stronger than I am, and he can change direction. When you see a guy who can flip his hips back and forth, change direction and run, that’s huge. That’s a freak.”

The Chiefs signed Martin as an undrafted free agent out of Columbia last year, and he spent eight weeks on the practice squad last season before appearing in five games.

With a 40-yard time of 4.57 seconds, the Chiefs are hoping to utilize Martin’s quickness.

“That’s the one thing they worry about is that speed,” Martin said of opposing offensive linemen. “I try to use that to my advantage, and make that an every-down thing.”

Martin worked out with Hali in March and July on Hermosa Beach in Los Angeles, joined by Bears defensive end Lamarr Houston and martial arts expert Ryron Gracie of the world-renowned Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Academy.

Together, they did sprint drills in the sand to improve their speed and strength, and Gracie helped all of the players with using their hands at close range.

“The sand allows you to make cuts at full speed,” Martin said. “In order to use that speed on the edge, you have to be able to change directions and the sand really helps that.”

The second-year pro’s dedication to spend the offseason improving left an impression on Hali, who is one of the longest-tenured members of the Chiefs.

“It just shows he’s willing to learn,” Hali said. “He’s young in the game and he wants to be around a person who has been around and doing it. I haven’t always had success throughout my career, but I eventually learned how to do it. That says a lot about him.”

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