- The Washington Times - Monday, August 25, 2014

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Pot vending machines, cannibis-centered news organizations, weed-friendly party planners - the changing culture prompted by marijuana legalization is on the increase. But the public may not be keeping up.

Voters in yet another state are confronting the complicated reality of legalization, both pro and con.

Marijuana use is not necessarily the politically damning force of yore, for instance. A new Quinnipiac University Poll that finds that 77 percent of New York voters say that if a candidate for governor had used weed in the past, it would not affect their vote one way or another. A little partisan divide here: 64 percent of Republicans and 78 percent of Democrats agree.

These voters are leery of weed, however: Another 82 percent overall say if recreational use became legal, they still would “definitely” or “probably” not use it. That includes 92 percent of Republicans and 82 percent of Democrats.

And the ultimate numbers on approval: 44 percent overall approve of legalizing medical marijuana, 35 percent approve legalization for “personal use” while 19 percent condemn legalization altogether.

There’s “little love for recreational marijuana in New York,” notes Maurice Carroll, assistant director of the survey.

A similar poll of Colorado voters from the college last month also revealed some reservations about such legislation. Though a majority of Coloradans still support legalization,  66 percent said marijuana use should be legal in members-only clubs, not in bars, clubs and entertainment venues.

 
 

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