- Associated Press - Saturday, August 30, 2014

Five things to know about the mid-term election in Vermont on Nov. 4.

WHO’S ON THE BALLOT?

Vermonters will elect six statewide officeholders: governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer and auditor of accounts. The state’s lone representative to the U.S. House is also up for election. Voters will also select 150 members of the House of Representatives and 30 members of the Senate.

TWO-YEAR GOVERNOR TERMS

Vermont is one of two states - the other is New Hampshire - where the governor is elected every two years. Over the years some Vermont politicians have favored expanding the governor’s term to four years, arguing it would give the chief executive more time to governor and require less campaigning, but those efforts have gone nowhere. Others feel the two-year term keeps governors responsive to the electorate.

SHUMLIN GOES FOR THREE

Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin, first elected in 2010, is running for his third term. He is being challenged by Republican Scott Milne, a Pomfret businessman. During the GOP primary, Milne was challenged by a Libertarian who mounted an unsuccessful write-in campaign.

REMATCH FOR U.S. HOUSE

Incumbent U.S. Rep. Peter Welch, a Democrat, is being challenged by Woodstock police officer Mark Donka, who lost to Welch in 2012 by a margin of more than 3-to-1. Welch, a lawyer, was first elected to Congress in 2006 after a long career in public service. Donka has said he was forced into politics by the growing federal debt.

SEEKING WRITE-IN NOD FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

On Tuesday, Dean Corren will likely be declared the winner of the Progressive and Democratic nominations for lieutenant governor. If so, he’ll face Republican Phil Scott. Corren ran unopposed in the Progressive Party primary and sought write-in votes as the only declared candidate in the Democratic primary.

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