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“I have complete faith and trust that the governor is telling the truth, and I continue to believe that he would be a superb president if he were elected in the future,” he said.

Matt Mackowiak, a Texas-based Republican consultant, agreed that Christie’s chances on a national stage won’t be harmed as long as he has been honest about what he knew.

“As long as he was telling the truth, he is fine,” Mackowiak said. “But if he knew about this, it brings him in directly and adds - potentially - dishonesty to the charges.”

Christie received a smattering of boos and some cheers during a pre-game ceremony in New York on Saturday. He didn’t appear affected by the crowd’s reaction during the Times Square ceremony.

Also Saturday, the lawyer for a state legislative panel investigating the traffic jams said he was confident the probe can continue without impeding a federal criminal investigation.

Reid Schar, special counsel to the panel, said he had discussed the parallel probes with officials from the U.S. Attorney’s office Friday and said the committee “would be mindful” not to interfere with the ongoing criminal investigation.

The lawmaker who chairs that panel said Wildstein’s new allegations validate the skepticism committee members have expressed throughout the probe, an investigation Christie once referred to as the Democrats’ obsession and some state Republicans have called “a witch hunt.”

Assemblyman John Wisniewski, a Democrat, said he doesn’t know what evidence Wildstein may have but said it could be an email or document that fell beyond the date range called for in the original subpoena.

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Elliott reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Ken Thomas in Washington, Karen Matthews in New York and Geoff Mulvihill in Haddonfield, N.J., contributed to this story.

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Follow Angela Delli Santi at http://twitter.com/AngeDelliSanti