- Associated Press - Monday, February 10, 2014

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. (AP) - Tom Horn leads a busy life.

On a typical day, the born-and-raised Jeffersonville resident attends mass at St. Augustine Catholic Church, enjoys breakfast at a local diner with friends and then runs some errands or goes for a 30-minute ride on the exercise bike. He caps the day off with an hour of reading before bed at midnight.

“I like to do things,” he said. “I stay active.”

But what separates Horn from most other local folks is his age: in January, he celebrated his 102nd birthday.

“I’ve had good health, good friends, and I’ve always been a good church member,” Horn said. “And it seems like those three things keep you going.”

Born in 1912, Horn has seen the world and Jeffersonville change around him, witnessing both global and political changes and developments happening in his backyard.

Horn grew up on Clark Street in a family of nine, born right in the middle of five boys. He said most days were spent at the play square, which is now Colston Park, or playing down in the Ohio River - which looked nothing like it does today.

“You could go out to about the middle of the river, and it wouldn’t be over your head. It was all sandy,” he told the News and Tribune (http://bit.ly/LPSioV ).

Horn, who said he learned to swim in the Ohio, said he remembers floating on logs behind barges in the river, riding on the waves.

“All us kids, we were in the river all the time,” he said.

In 1931, Horn was a forward for the Jeffersonville High School basketball team at a time when the rules were different and games were low-scoring - the Red Devils beat New Albany High School 17-5.

“Every time you made a basket, you had to go back to the center and toss the ball up,” he said. Horn has held season tickets to Jeffersonville High basketball games for 50 years now and almost never misses a game.

Horn married his wife, Florence Jolly, in 1941.

“But nobody knew her name as Florence,” he said. “She was Jolly. All the time.”

However, his time with Jolly was cut short when he enlisted in the Army in 1942 and served as a field depot in World War II, supporting troops at the line with backup supplies in England and Normandy.

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