Washington Times journalists win national awards

Sports editor, photographer honored

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The Washington Times’ sports editor Mike Harris and photojournalist Andrew Harnik each won major awards from national journalism organizations Tuesday.

Mr. Harris was chosen as the D.C. Sportswriter of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association for his distinctive work as a columnist, on top of his daily job supervising The Times’ sports coverage.

Mr. Harnik won three awards in the White House News Photographers Association photojournalism competition, including 2nd and 3rd place in feature photography and an award of excellence for pictorial photography.

Mike and Andrew are two great journalists whose distinctive work makes our news products better each day for our audiences,” said The Times’ Editor John Solomon. “We’re thrilled that their colleagues in the industry have recognized their outstanding achievements.”

The NSSA will honor Mr. Harris in June at its annual awards banquet in North Carolina. The Times now has the distinction of being home to the two most recent recipients of sportswriter of the year awards. Brian McNally won the honor last year.

“I am very appreciative of my peers who thought enough of my work to vote for me,” said Mr. Harris, who joined The Times in 2011. “This is a significant honor in our profession. The list of those who have won NSSA awards is impressive and I’m frankly still trying to get my arms around my name being on there.”

Mr. Harnik’s award-winning photography includes photos of children playing in Navy Yard fountains during the sweltering summer heat, Naval Academy freshmen taking part in a grueling tradition that earns them the right to call themselves midshipmen, and an artistic shot of the U.S. Capitol Building as the shutdown loomed.

“A lot goes into finding a really good image and sometimes you have to have a lot of forethought and planning to be in the right place at the right time,” Mr. Harnik said. “The waterfall photo was to illustrate a hot summer day and I waited at a water park for hours before a young girl walked into the fountain with her eyes closed and there was the photo for the day.”

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