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“He was a one-of-a-kind baseball lifer,” he said.

Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig spoke of Fregosi’s widespread relationships in the game.

“The outpouring of support in recent days illustrates the vast respect that Jim earned in a great baseball life,” Selig said in a statement.

Fregosi was an infielder in the majors from 1961 to 1978, hitting .265 with 151 homers and 706 RBIs. His best seasons came with the Angels.

From 1964-69, he teamed with second baseman Bobby Knoop to form a strong double-play combination. They played together in the 1966 All-Star game.

Knoop, now an Angels coach, said Fregosi was the kind of guy who “would not have a tattoo, but would cover your back. He was a tremendous person who had tremendous passion for the game and loved the Angels.”

The Angels retired Fregosi’s No. 11 in 1988 and said he was a personal favorite of former owner Gene Autry.

“His personality was infectious, his love of the game legendary, and his knowledge endless,” the team said in a statement.

Fregosi was traded from the Angels to the Mets after the 1971 season for a package of players that included Ryan. Fregosi played just 146 games over two seasons for the Mets and hit .233 with five home runs; Ryan turned into a Hall of Fame pitcher.

Fregosi later played for the Texas Rangers and Pittsburgh Pirates. He began his managing career at 36 with the Angels in April 1978 - two days after his final game as a player with the Pirates.

In 15 seasons as a manager, he posted a 1,028-1,094 record.

With the Phillies, Fregosi handled a team that included a lot of rough-and-tumble players and helped them reach the 1993 World Series. Philadelphia was beaten by Toronto on Joe Carter’s winning home run in Game 6.

Former Phillies catcher Darren Daulton called Fregosi “the best manager I’ve ever played for.”

“Our relationship was so special … and he was the one that taught me how to be a leader,” Daulton said. “Fregos and I could relate to each other whether we were in the clubhouse or on the field. In 1993 The City of Brotherly Love changed the world … Fregos was the driving force!”

Lenny Dykstra, a Phillies star in those days, said Fregosi “was a player’s manager.”

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