Canada takes bobsled gold as Elana Meyers, USA-1 save worst run for last

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They were second behind Meyers and Williams in USA-1 after the first two runs on Tuesday and left the track not knowing or caring how far behind they were. The way they saw it, showing up on Wednesday and going as fast as they could was all that mattered.

Moyse did acknowledge that she knew a comeback was possible.

And after the third heat, that was obvious to everyone. They cut by more than half the 0.23-second deficit they faced entering Wednesday’s final two heats. Humphries went next-to-last in the final run, throwing down a sizzling 57.92 to put the pressure on USA-1. Moments later, when Meyers had an early skid in her final trip down the track, the gold was essentially decided.

Still, USA-1 hardly seemed dissatisfied with Sochi silver. After all, just a few days ago, they needed their sled rebuilt after a crash — and still almost won gold.

“It’s been an incredible journey,” Meyers said.

When it was over, Williams wrapped herself in an American flag, jumping up and down while she and Meyers smiled broadly.

Not long afterward, all three U.S. teams — including Lolo Jones of Des Moines, Iowa, and Jazmine Fenlator of Wayne, N.J., who were 11th in USA-3 — were arm in arm, celebrating that two medals are America-bound.

And to Jones, seeing Williams — a fellow track athlete turned bobsledder — etch her spot in Olympic history meant just about everything.

“She’s like a Jesse Owens. I hope she just inspired a whole country,” Jones said. “When I get home I hope she’s a household name. Her transformation was the most brilliant thing I’ve ever watched.”

For Jones, it was not the Olympics she dreamed about. Her third trip to the games — the first two as a hurdler, in Beijing and London — also ended without a medal.

Jones clipped a hurdle to lose what would have been gold in Beijing and fought through injury to finish fourth in London, finding both results difficult to accept. At these games, going home without a medal was hardly her fault, as the push times for USA-3 — which was not expected to be in medal contention — were hardly the problem.

As a few fans chanted their names, Fenlator and Jones both gave big waves, accompanied by wide smiles when it was over.

That alone seemed like victory for Jones, whose first two Olympic experiences ended in heartbreak. And after the racing was done, all six women on the U.S. Olympic team — the “wolfpack,” they called themselves — celebrated their season, together.

“This has been amazing,” Williams said, “all the way to the end.”

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