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Later Wednesday, Tolokonnikova, Alekhina and two others held another surprise mini-performance in central Sochi, this time next to the Olympic rings in front of City Hall.

Jumping up and down, one playing a plastic guitar, they sang-shouted in Russian: “Putin will teach you how to love the motherland!” A person dressed as one of the Olympic mascots joined them for a moment in an apparent joke.

Police were watching but did not intervene. A few passersby heckled them and yelled at onlookers, saying they should be ashamed to watch.

Some opponents showed up later, one dressed like a chicken and others waving pieces of paper bearing crude sexual slurs against the band.

“We are not glad to see them. They should not be spoiling the Olympics. The Olympics are a beautiful thing in the life of every Russian,” said one of the men, Sochi resident Oleg Boltovsky.

On Tuesday, Tolokonnikova and Alekhina were briefly detained in Sochi, but not arrested.

Pussy Riot’s two run-ins with authorities in two days, the recent detention of gay rights and environmental activists, and violence in neighboring Ukraine have cast a shadow for some spectators on the sporting achievements on display in Sochi.

Three Pussy Riot members told The Associated Press on Wednesday that they plan to resume periodic protest actions and performances in the future, though said they had no plans to target Olympic venues themselves, for which they would need tickets and official clearance, like all spectators at the games.

International Olympic Committee spokesman Mark Adams said Wednesday that any Pussy Riot protest at the Olympics would be “wholly inappropriate.”

The Pussy Riot members, excited and passionate but vague about their goals, described a loose collection of ideals, including fighting against prison abuse as well as feminist, gay rights, anti-corruption and environmental causes. They spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of being targeted by police.