Correction: Canada-Obit-Gallant story

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TORONTO (AP) - In a story Feb. 18 about the death of author Mavis Gallant, The Associated Press, quoting an editor from The New Yorker, reported erroneously that the magazine published 114 of Gallant’s stories. The correct number of stories published was 116.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Famed Montreal-born writer Mavis Gallant dies

Famed Canadian-born writer Mavis Gallant dies at 91; Paris-based master of short story

TORONTO (AP) - Mavis Gallant, the Montreal-born writer who carved out an international reputation as a master short-story author while living in Paris for decades, died Tuesday at age 91, her publisher said.

The bilingual Quebecoise started out as a journalist and went on to publish well over 100 short stories in her lauded career, many of them in The New Yorker magazine and in collections such as “The Other Paris, “Across the Bridge” and “In Transit.”

Random House in Canada confirmed the death, saying she died in her Paris apartment Tuesday morning.

American author Joyce Carol Oates compared Gallant to another Canadian short story master, Alice Munro, who captured the 2013 Nobel Prize for literature.

Mavis Gallant enormous influence on Alice Munro,” Oates wrote on Twitter. “Perhaps the Nobel Prize should have been shared at no loss to two great Canadian writers.”

Munro herself said: “Mavis Gallant was a marvelous short story writer and a constant hopeful influence on my life.”

Gallant’s following in the United States remained small. Many of her books remain out of print, short stories tend not to be best sellers and as a Canadian living in Paris she often wrote about foreign cultures.

Another Canadian literary luminary, Margaret Atwood, tweeted: “Very sad to hear that MavisGallant has died… wonderful, scrappy person, wonderful writer, fascinating life.”

Born Mavis Leslie Young in Montreal in 1922, Gallant was an only child in an English-speaking Protestant family that splintered: her father died when she was young, and her mother remarried. Starting from age 4, she was dispatched to numerous boarding schools in Canada and the U.S. Many were French-speaking, and she was usually the only English speaker.

After graduation, Gallant returned to Montreal and landed an entry-level stint at the National Film Board and then a job as a reporter for the Montreal Standard.

Gallant married Winnipeg musician John Gallant in 1942, but they divorced five years later. In 1950, she kept a promise she had made to herself to quit journalism by age 30 - she was 28. She began traveling Europe, subsisting on her fees from The New Yorker and by giving English lessons.

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