Sochi Olympics: Ted Ligety dominates for gold in giant slalom

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KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — This was the race Ted Ligety knew he should win.

So did everybody else.


PHOTOS: Ligety holds huge lead after 1st giant slalom run


And that, Ligety explained Wednesday after becoming the first American man in Olympic history with two Alpine skiing gold medals, was precisely what made the feat so tough.

Sometimes, being a popular pick can be overwhelming. Ligety learned that four years ago, and dealt with the matter far better on this day.

Scraping the snow with his gloves and hips while taking wide turns around gates, his body swaying left and right with a pendulum’s precision, Ligety finished the two-leg giant slalom with a combined time of 2 minutes, 45.29 seconds, winning by nearly a half-second.

Men's giant slalom gold medalist Ted Ligety of the United States poses for photographers with the American flag on the podium at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.(AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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Men’s giant slalom gold medalist Ted Ligety of the United States poses ... more >

His gold is the first for the U.S. Alpine team at the Sochi Games. Yet Ligety’s overriding emotion as he fell to the ground in the finish area was something other than pure joy.

“It was a huge relief,” said Ligety, a 29-year-old based in Park City, Utah. “All season long, everybody talks about the Olympics, Olympics, Olympics. At a certain point, I was just like, ‘Let’s do it already. Let’s get this thing over with, so we can stop talking about the pressure and everything with it.’ So it’s awesome to … finally do it and get the monkey off the back.”

He used a perfect first run to open a wide lead of nearly a second, then protected that with a conservative second run that was only 14th-fastest down the Rosa Khutor course as the sun peeked out from behind a nearby peak and through sparse clouds. All in all, much more comfortable conditions than the fog, rain and sleet of a day earlier.


SEE ALSO: Bode Miller pulls out of slalom; Olympic career finished?


“His first run was flawless, free. He trusted himself. It was his signature skiing,” U.S. men’s head coach Sasha Rearick said. “The second run was a strategic chess match, which he executed brilliantly.”

France earned its first Alpine medals of the Sochi Olympics, with Steve Missilier producing the day’s top second leg to earn silver, 0.48 seconds behind Ligety. Alexis Pinturault got the bronze, another 0.16 back. Overall World Cup leader Marcel Hirscher of Austria was fourth, while Bode Miller was 20th in what was his last race of the Sochi Games — and, given that he’ll be 40 in 2018, probably of his Olympic career.

Miller, who has won a U.S.-record six Alpine medals, said other racers try to copy Ligety’s revolutionary style in the giant slalom, but “he’s so much better at it than everybody else.”

Ligety maintains momentum by fluidly linking his turns, one into the next, actually taking a longer path down the slope by steering so far from each gate. Opponents cut much closer to gates, but then lose valuable hundredths of a second each time they jerk their bodies in a different direction.

“He carries so much speed and doesn’t make mistakes. Those are the things that separate him,” Miller explained. “Other guys carry speed for a couple of turns and struggle a bit. He just carries it smooth from top to bottom.”

Asked whether Ligety could have been beaten, Missiller replied: “It is impossible. For me and, I think, for all racers.”

The only other American with a pair of Olympic Alpine golds is Andrea Mead Lawrence, winner of the women’s slalom and giant slalom in 1952.

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