Oregon won’t defend gay-marriage ban in lawsuit

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PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Oregon’s attorney general will not defend the state’s ban on gay marriage, arguing it cannot withstand a federal constitutional challenge.

Ellen Rosenblum joins fellow Democratic attorneys general in at least five other states who have pledged not to fight for their state bans on gay marriage.

“State Defendants will not defend the Oregon ban on same-sex marriage in this litigation,” Rosenblum said in the documents filed in federal court Thursday. “Rather, they will take the position … that the ban cannot withstand a federal constitutional challenge under any standard of review.”

Rosenblum’s decision comes less than a month after a federal judge decided to consolidate two lawsuits alleging Oregon’s 2004 voter-approved ban violates the U.S. Constitution. While she personally supports gay marriage, Rosenblum said her opinion did not factor into the decision.

In fact, as a state appeals court judge she was part of a panel that unanimously upheld the ban in 2008 under the state constitution.

But the balance nationally has shifted in six years, with a pair of federal decisions dramatically altering the legal landscape regarding gay rights, and polling reflecting increasing acceptance of gay marriage.

“Because we cannot identify a valid reason for the state to prevent the couples who have filed these lawsuits from marrying in Oregon, we find ourselves unable to stand before (the federal judge) to defend the state’s prohibition against marriages between two men or two women,” Rosenblum said during a news conference at the state Capitol.

She said the state would actively participate in the case, but she declined to say whether her office will argue that the ban should be overturned. The state is still working on its legal analysis, she said, and the arguments should be made first in court.

The rulings that have impacted the national debate include the U.S. Supreme Court’s June decision to strike down part of the federal law that prevented the government from recognizing same-sex marriages.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also recently found that gays and lesbians cannot be precluded from jury duty because of their sexual orientation. That ruling extended civil rights protections to gays that the U.S. Supreme Court previously promised only to women and racial minorities.

The two decisions create an atmosphere in which Rosenblum and other attorneys general believe will make defenses of gay-marriage bans unlikely to succeed.

Gay marriage supporters in Oregon celebrated Rosenblum’s statement Thursday, and said the decision could preclude an expensive political fight.

“No one is interested in engaging in an expensive political campaign if we don’t have to,” said Mike Marshall of Oregon United for Marriage.

But gay marriage opponents, including the National Organization of Marriage, said Rosenblum is shirking her duties as the top lawyer for her state.

“She swore an oath of office that she would enforce all the laws, not just those she personally agrees with,” said Brian Brown, the group’s president. “Ms. Rosenblum is dead-wrong in her conclusion that the amendment cannot be supported by rational legal arguments.”

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