Pair sentenced in Dodger Stadium beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow

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LOS ANGELES — One of the greatest tragedies played out at Dodger Stadium in recent years was recalled in a courtroom just miles away as two men pleaded guilty Thursday to a 2011 beating that left San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow brain damaged and disabled.

They were immediately sentenced by an angry judge who called them cowards and the sort of people that sports fans fear when they go to games.

“You are the biggest nightmare for people who attend public events,” said Superior Court Judge George Lomeli as he faced Louis Sanchez and Marvin Norwood across a courtroom crowded with media and members of Stow’s family who wept and denounced the two men.

He noted that Sanchez was smirking during his remarks.

“This is not funny,” he snapped at Sanchez who said he knew that.

Sanchez, 31, acknowledging he kicked and punched Stow, pleaded guilty to one count of mayhem that disabled and disfigured the victim. He was sentenced to eight years in prison with credit for 1,086 days.

The complaint specified that he cut and disabled Stow’s tongue, put out an eye and slit his nose, ear and lip in addition to other injuries that left him brain damaged.

Norwood pleaded guilty to one count of assault likely to produce great bodily injury and was sentenced to four years. His credit for time already in custody appeared to account for at least the majority of that term. Deputy District Attorney Michele Hanisee said Norwood could be released immediately.

But federal authorities said it would not be so fast. They have charged both men with weapons possession charges that could send them to federal prison for an additional 10 years.

The men were sentenced after Stow’s family addressed the court. His sisters wept.

David Stow, the victim’s father, placed a Giants ball cap on a podium.

“The years you spend in prison is what you cretins deserve,” he said as Sanchez smirked at him.

The victim’s sister, Bonnie Stow, described her brother’s anguished life.

“We shower him, we dress him, we fix his meals,” she said. “We make sure he gets his 13 medications throughout the day. He takes two different anti-seizure medications to prevent the seizures he endured for months after you brutally and cowardly attacked him.”

Lomeli told the men: “You not only ruined the life of Mr. Stow (but) his children, his family, his friends.”

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