Confident Sam wishes focus could stay on football

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Michael Sam needed no introduction.

He provided one anyway, subtly spelling out his desire to be known simply as a football player whose sexuality isn’t a national story.

“Good afternoon. My name is Michael Sam. I play football for the University of Missouri,” he said to commence his first public appearance since announcing he’s gay.

Sam smiled and laughed often during a 12½-minute news conference at Lucas Oil Stadium, looking relaxed, jovial and confident while taking questions from the hundreds of reporters surrounding the podium.

Though Sam said he’s been too busy working out to absorb the coverage in the two weeks since his revelation, he chided the media a bit for the volume of analysis of this watershed moment in sports. Sam will be the first open homosexual in the NFL.

“I wish you guys would just say, ‘Michael Sam, how’s football going? How’s training going?’ I would love for you to ask me that question. But it is what it is. And I just wish you guys would just see me as Michael Sam the football player instead of Michael Sam the gay football player.”

Coaches and executives around the league were asked often this weekend for their thoughts on how Sam would fit, both on the field and in the locker room. Nobody would acknowledge any hesitation, of course, and there was a predictable theme to the responses.

“It’s a results business. Can Michael Sam help us win?” Cleveland Browns coach Mike Pettine said.

Sam said he was not worried about being accepted, either, in light of the bullying scandal that emerged involving Miami Dolphins offensive linemen.

“If the Miami Dolphins drafted me I would be excited to be a part of that organization,” Sam said. “But I’m not afraid of going into that environment. I know how to handle myself. I know how to communicate with my teammates. I know how to communicate with the coaches and other staff.”

Sam has heard the slurs before, but if he’s in any way anxious about entering such a macho environment he has not shown it.

“If someone wants to call me a name, I’ll have a conversation with that guy and hopefully it won’t lead to nothing else,” he said.

Sam wore a rainbow-colored button that read “Stand with Sam,” given to him by a woman at a recent Missouri basketball game. Sam beamed about all the support he’s received, originating on campus.

“M-i-z-z-o-u. I’m a Tiger forever,” he said.

The Missouri teammates who joined him this weekend at the league’s annual scouting combine were returning the praise.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus