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When the final tally is in, Target’s breach may eclipse the biggest known data breach at a retailer, one disclosed in 2007 at the parent company of TJMaxx that affected 90 million records.

Target is offering free credit monitoring services for a year to those who had their data compromised.

John Mulligan, Target’s chief financial officer, told The Associated Press Wednesday that the most loyal customers have stuck with Target, but wooing back others will take time.

“We need to remind people why they fell in love with Target,” he said.

Target is now accelerating its $100 million plan to implement the use of chip-enabled technology by early 2015 in all 1,800 stores to protect itself against cyber thieves.

It isn’t clear when Target will fully recover from the breach, but Avivah Litan, a security analyst at Gartner Inc., puts the costs of the breach at between $400 million and $450 million.

Target’s results are also being weighed down by stumbles in its expansion into Canada, its first foray outside the U.S.

Target is trying to fix problems with shortages and Canadians’ perception that prices are too high. The company had opened about 124 stores, at locations once owned by Canadian retailer Zellers, by the end of last year.

The company said it expects earnings per share for the current quarter to range from 60 cents to 75 cents. Analysts had previously expected 88 cents.

For the full year, Target expects earnings per share to range between $3.85 and $4.15. Analysts had expected $4.21.