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Anyone with an 8 on the card before breakfast gets cold has reason to think the tournament effectively is over. Johnson looked to be in shock as he stood in the 11th fairway. He was between a 6-iron and a 7-iron, went for the 6-iron and saw it come down in the water.

Because he carried the water the entire way, he had to drop well back in the fairway.

Johnson went up 10 paces (still behind the hazard line) and went with the 7-iron. That didn’t make it. So he took a few steps back and changed to the 6-iron and pulled that to the left back of the green.

“That was the worst shot I hit of the three,” he said.

But instead of getting down, Johnson thought back to the time he was in the second stage of Q-school. On the opening hole, he took an 8.

“I hit the ball eight times without a penalty,” he said. “And I finished second.”

He still had at least 34 holes remaining and started putting them to good use, especially how he closed out the back nine with three straight birdies.

“Not surprising knowing how tough this guy is,” said Woods, who played alongside Johnson and wound up four shots worse. “He was pretty stoked about what he did today.”

Woods is still trying to emerge.

As the defending champion and an eight-time winner at Torrey Pines, he missed the 54-hole cut. At Dubai, where he was a two-time winner, he tied for 41st. Woods has played in only four tournaments, not including the Presidents Cup, since the Tour Championship last September. He talked Wednesday about possibly altering his pre-Masters schedule, though he has not made clear what he meant by that.

The biggest issue was converting birdie chances.

He opened with three shots pin-high, two from about 18 feet, the other from 6 feet, and never touched the hole.

“It certainly wasn’t together today,” he said. “Didn’t get into a roll early.”