AP News in Brief at 8:58 p.m. EST

Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Akiki was in retreat before Thursday’s ceremony and unavailable for an interview.

Eastern Catholic churches in the Middle East and Europe ordain married men. However, the Vatican banned the practice in America in the 1920s after Latin-rite bishops complained it was confusing for parishioners. But Pope John Paul II called for greater acceptance of Eastern Catholic traditions. And over the years, popes have made exceptions on a case-by-case basis for married men to become Eastern Catholic priests in America.

“Almost half of our priests in Lebanon are married, so it’s not an unusual event in the life of the Maronite Church, though in the United States it is,” Deacon Louis Peters, chancellor at St. Raymond’s, said Thursday.

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Mormon church: Members not taught they’ll get planet in afterlife, as told in ‘Book of Mormon’

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The Mormon Church is pushing back against the notion that members of the faith are taught they’ll get their own planet in the afterlife, a misconception popularized in pop culture most recently by the Broadway show “The Book of Mormon.”

A newly posted article affirms the faith’s belief that humans can become like God in eternity, but says the “cartoonish image of people receiving their own planets” is not how members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints envision it.

“While few Latter-day Saints would identify with caricatures of having their own planet, most would agree that the awe inspired by creation hints at our creative potential in the eternities,” the article says.

The expectation of exaltation is more figurative and ambiguous than boiling it down to living on one planet, it says.

“Church members imagine exaltation less through images of what they will get and more through the relationships they have now and how those relationships might be purified and elevated,” the article says.

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Creation Museum founder: Bill Nye debate emboldened supporters to get ark project funded

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - The founder of a Bible-themed museum who recently debated evolution with TV’s “Science Guy” Bill Nye says the widely watched event helped to boost enthusiasm among followers who invested in a project to build a 510-foot Noah’s Ark.

Creation Museum founder Ken Ham said Thursday that a $62 million municipal bond offering has raised enough money to begin construction on the wooden ark, estimated to cost about $73 million. Groundbreaking is planned for May and the ark is expected to be finished by the summer of 2016.

“It did help,” Ham said of the Feb. 4 debate with Nye. “We obviously had a big spurt toward the end (of the bond deadline), and I think it was people who were involved in this, who really decided they were going to do something.”

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