Sedate Super Bowl ads upstaged by a coat

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NEW YORK (AP) - The Seattle Seahawks had a blowout victory Sunday night, but there was no big winner in the Super Bowl ad contest.

Many advertisers went for a more serious, toned-down feel than in previous years. Budweiser, Coca-Cola and Chrysler all hit patriotic notes. RadioShack got praise for its surprisingly frank acknowledgement of its dated image - and its use of 1980s pop culture figures including Alf. And “Seinfeld” characters Jerry, George and Newman got together for a mini reunion for Jerry Seinfeld’s show “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.”

Still, the ads seemed to be upstaged by Joe Namath, at least on social media. When the football hero appeared on the field for the coin toss wearing a massive fur coat, Twitter and other sites buzzed with jokes. The reaction to most ads was much more muted.

Here’s a look at some things you might know - and some things you don’t - about the ads.

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BOB DYLAN‘S SUPER BOWL

Legendary musician Bob Dylan appeared in a Chrysler ad that had been kept tightly under wraps. Dylan walked through the streets of Detroit explaining that the city made cars and that “cars made America.”

In case you didn’t get the point, he goes on to explain in his familiar raspy voice:

“Let Germany brew your beer, let Switzerland make your watch, let Asia assemble your phone. We will build your car.”

It was the second appearance of the night for Dylan, if you count his popular 1960s tune of “I Want You” that played in the Chobani ad.

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A FIRST

A Coke ad showed a quick shot of gay couple and their daughter, marking the first time a gay family was included in a Super Bowl ad, according to GLAAD, an advocacy group for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

A longer version of the ad is set to air during the opening ceremony of the Olympic winter games in Sochi.

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