Correction: Legal License Fight story

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - In a story Jan. 27 about the California Supreme Court’s denial of a law license to former journalist Stephen Glass, The Associated Press relying on information from the court reported erroneously the publisher of a key article fabricated by Glass. The article “Hack Heaven” was published in The New Republic, not George magazine.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Court: Disgraced ex-journalist can’t practice law

California high court denies law license to ex-journalist who fabricated stories in magazines

By PAUL ELIAS

Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The California Supreme Court on Monday denied a law license to a disgraced former journalist who was caught fabricating dozens of stories for major national magazines.

The unanimous seven-judge court ruled that Stephen Glass had insufficiently rehabilitated himself in the years since his misdeeds, saying he “failed to carry his heavy burden of establishing his rehabilitation and current fitness.”

Glass‘ misdeeds stunned the profession when they were uncovered in 1998. His widely publicized fall from grace earned the rising star a prominent place in the pantheon of journalistic cheats and scoundrels such as Janet Cooke and Jayson Blair - two prominent reporters caught fabricating quotes, sources and entire stories.

Glass‘ ethical missteps were turned into the Hollywood movie “Shattered Glass” and recounted in his novel “The Fabulist,” for which he earned $190,000.

Glass, 41, now works as a paralegal for a Los Angeles law firm and lives in a suburb. Through his lawyer, Glass declined an interview request.

Attorney Jon Eisenberg said his client “appreciates the court’s consideration of his application and respects the court’s decision.”

Glass went to work for The New Republic magazine in 1995 and began filing colorful and attention-grabbing articles, including a racially explosive piece that culminated with his supposedly witnessing the robbery of a cab driver.

He also filed stories reporting that young, politically conservative Republican men were more interested in sex and drugs than politics, and about a supposed encounter with a computer company help desk that brought an anti-Semitic slur.

In the end, 31 of 42 articles Glass published in The New Republic were found to contain significant fabrications and falsehoods.

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Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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