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Even Ringo Starr didn’t know the magnitude of what was about to happen when he played with his bandmates that night.

“Incredible!” he recalls. “It was ‘Ed Sullivan,’ it was a big show. We didn’t know while we were playing that 70 million people were watching, but it was being in America that was so exciting.

“All the music we loved was in America, it came from America to England.”

While holed up at their Manhattan hotel, they were interviewed by the city’s leading deejays, which, all by itself, was an amazing experience.

“With Murray the K and Cousin Brucie, we were on the radio - we were in the hotel rooms on the phone to Murray the K. You didn’t have anything like that in England. The whole experience was just incredible.”

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CBS anchor Walter Cronkite scored tickets to the “Sullivan Show” for his teenage daughters Nancy and Kathy.

“The Beatles were already huge, and huge to me - monumental!” Kathy Cronkite says. “The idea of seeing them in person was like going to another planet. And when we got there we were screaming our heads off, so we couldn’t hear the music.

“Then, afterward, we got to meet them,” she adds. “They were very nice. They put their arms around us for a picture, which was really fabulous. Ringo and I happened to be standing next to each other, and he was MY Beatle. So that was especially exciting.”

For Cronkite, a former actress who appeared in the classic film “Network” but is now a mental-health advocate, many of the details have vanished with the passage of time.

“In the scope of the rest of my life, it has faded in significance somewhat,” she says, but takes pains to emphasize, “I don’t mean it wasn’t important. At the time it was absolutely huge. And back then, when I was 13, I’m sure I thought it was the main thing that would EVER matter.”

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Pat DiNizio, lead singer of the New Jersey-based rock band the Smithereens, not only remembers seeing the Beatles on “Sullivan,” but also vividly recalls the first moment he heard their music.

He was 8 years old, brushing his teeth with his red transistor radio on when the disc jockey announced he was playing “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Stunned by the sound, he dropped the toothbrush. He watched the show from the living room of his home in Scotch Plains, N.J., with his parents.

“I wanted to be them. I wanted to do what they did. I wanted to have my haircut like that and I wanted to be in a rock ‘n’ roll band,” he says. “That was a major, major important event for the youth of America. My parents couldn’t have been over 30 years old and they didn’t dig the Beatles too much. They didn’t dig the long hair.”

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