- Associated Press - Thursday, February 6, 2014

TULSA, Okla. (AP) - Tulsa officials say few people are taking part in an amnesty program intended to clear a backlog of 19,000 parking tickets.

The program ends Friday. The Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/1fKGjoa ) reports that fewer than 200 of the tickets had been cleared as of Tuesday, generating about $4,000 for the city.

“The thing is that people just need to take care of their obligations,” said municipal court administrator Kelly Brader.

Under the amnesty program, the city will waive late fees and court costs for drivers who agree to pay the base fine due. A similar program in 2009 raised $15,060 and cleared 854 parking tickets.

Brader said the amnesty program covers only parking tickets, not moving violations or other citations. One motorist has 106 unpaid tickets.

He said the city was prepared to attach a metal “boot” to cars, or tow them, if their drivers have outstanding violations, and has pledged increased enforcement and collection efforts after Friday’s deadline.

“It’s one more day, and then we are stepping up enforcement,” Brader said. “We’re going to boot them, and either you pay by the end of the day or we tow them.”

Under city ordinances, a car can be towed if it is involved in two or more outstanding citations.

“We’re going to have boots on the ground,” she said. “It’s going to be a concentrated effort.”

In the extra enforcement effort, Brader said, officers will go through downtown looking up license plates and then boot or tow cars belonging to people who haven’t paid up.

City Manager Jim Twombly said the crackdown after the amnesty period will pose a serious inconvenience to people with multiple tickets.

“It will be noticed,” Twombly said. “We hope that people who have multiple tickets would take this opportunity to pay those fines and be done with it.”

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Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com

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