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Tacopina said Rodriguez no longer intended to report this month to the Yankees‘ training camp in Tampa, Fla. Suspensions only cover regular-season games and the postseason, with exhibitions specifically exempted.

Rodriguez will lose most of his $25 million salary - Horowitz ruled he is entitled to 21-183rds, which comes to $2,868,852.46. The third baseman will be 39 when he is eligible to return in a year, and he has incentive to play during the final three seasons of his contract. The Yankees owe him $21 million in 2015 and $20 million in each of the final two seasons of the record $275 million, 10-year deal.

But the 14-time All-Star has been hobbled by injuries in recent years and has not played a full season since 2007.

The timing of Rodriguez’s decision was set in motion by U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos, who on Jan. 30 told the player’s lawyers to respond by Friday to arguments from MLB and the union that the case should be dismissed.

Rodriguez does have one lawsuit remaining. He sued Yankees physician Dr. Christopher Ahmad and New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York State Supreme Court in October, claiming they mishandled his medical care during the 2012 AL playoffs. Rodriguez later was diagnosed with a hip injury that required surgery and did not return to the Yankees until Aug. 5 - hours after his suspension was announced by Selig.