- Associated Press - Sunday, February 9, 2014
Rybak: ‘Better than before’ since heart attack

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Former Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak says he feels ‘better than before’ about a month after suffering a heart attack.

Rybak made the comments Sunday on WCCO-TV (http://cbsloc.al/MCXAEXhttp://cbsloc.al/MCXAEX ). He says he is feeling good and has more energy.

Rybak also says that the signs of a heart attack weren’t quite what he expected. He said he thought a heart attack would feel like a stabbing in the chest. But instead, he says it felt like an elephant was on his chest and he couldn’t breathe.

He says he had a heart attack because of genetics - but because of his healthy lifestyle, he had zero heart damage.

He says it’s a reminder that it’s important to stay healthy and stay in shape.

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Frustrated with Minn. law, brewery to open in Wis.

NEW BRIGHTON, Minn. (AP) - The owner of a brewpub in New Brighton is frustrated with a Minnesota law that says he can’t sell his craft beer on store shelves - so he’s decided to build a new brewery across the border in Wisconsin.

John Moore, owner of Barley John’s Brew Pub, plans to break ground this spring on a new 10,000-barrel brewery in New Richmond, Wis., and hopes to start selling beer in the fall. His brewpub has been making beer for 14 years and has won awards, yet some craft beer aficionados have never heard of Barley John’s because it’s not on tap in other bars or sold in liquor and beer stores, he said.

“I think we make really, really good beer here, but few people have an opportunity to get at it because of the limitations in the state’s requirements,” Moore told the St. Paul Pioneer Press (http://bit.ly/M2hh9ghttp://bit.ly/M2hh9g ).

Minnesota’s limits on brewpubs are part of a three-tiered system of alcohol sales in the state, said Dan Schwarz, president of the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild. The system separates producers, distributors and retailers, and was meant to prevent large-scale breweries from having too much power over the retail market.

Minnesota’s laws on alcohol sales saw some loosening in 2011, when legislation known as the “Surly Bill” allowed breweries to open taprooms to serve beer on site. But Moore said the legislation didn’t help brewpubs, which could already serve beer on site.

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Scrutiny of PolyMet proposal turns to cleanup

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