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“But when people are asked why they feel that way, they can’t bring it to a single message,” he said.

Quarterback Tom Brady of the New England Patriots has been known to say “Omaha” during games and so has Peyton’s brother, New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning.

“Sally,” ”Alpha,” and “Kentucky” are among the many words that amount to gibberish to the typical fan, and sometimes they truly mean nothing.

But the words often are a signal to the rest of the offense to change a play or scheme - and defenses sometimes try to crack the code.

It was apparent that the Chargers associated “Omaha” with Manning’s snap count on Sunday because he lured five different San Diego players to jump offside, an unusually high number of penalties for the same infraction.

For the city of Omaha, the value of Manning’s shout-outs is impossible to calculate, Parrott said.

Parrott noted, however, that air time for a 30-second Super Bowl ad is $4 million this year. If Manning leads the Broncos to the Super Bowl and yells “Omaha” as many times as he did Sunday, well, that’s lots of free exposure.

“Commercials cost money to make, and you have to come up with the idea and hire a production company to make it. It could cost $4 million just for the production, and we get it for free,” Parrott said.

“Everybody in Omaha really needs to root for Peyton to take down Tom Brady and the Patriots so we can hear ‘Omaha’ in the Super Bowl.”

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AP Pro Football Writer Arnie Stapleton in Denver and AP Sports Writer Mike Marot in Indianapolis contributed to this report.