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“I’m going to heaven. I’ll see you there when you come,” he said.

Bohnert, McGuire’s public defender, said the court’s concerns over the method had been confirmed.

Stewart’s slaying went unsolved for 10 months until McGuire, jailed on an unrelated assault and hoping to improve his legal situation, told investigators he had information about the death. His attempts to pin the crime on his brother-in-law quickly unraveled, and he was accused of the killing.

More than a decade later, DNA evidence confirmed McGuire’s guilt, and he acknowledged his responsibility in a letter to Gov. John Kasich last month.

The death row inmate’s lawyers argued McGuire was mentally, physically and sexually abused as a child and had impaired brain function that made him prone to act impulsively.

“We have forgiven him, but that does not negate the need for him to pay for his actions,” Stewart’s family said in a statement after the execution.