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Oregon State’s defense keys 80-72 win over Oregon

- Associated Press - Monday, January 20, 2014

CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) - This time, Oregon State stuck to its game plan the second half.

Roberto Nelson scored 13 of his 22 points in the second half and anchored a stellar defensive effort that carried the Beavers to an 80-72 Pac-12 victory over Oregon Sunday night.

Eric Moreland added 15 points, 11 coming from the free throw line and had 13 rebounds for Oregon State (10-7, 2-3 Pac-12). The Beavers beat their in-state rivals at Gill Coliseum for the first time since 2010 and sent the slumping Ducks to their fourth consecutive loss.

Jason Calliste finished with 17 points and Richard Amardi had 13 points and six rebounds for the Ducks (13-4, 1-4), who trailed 37-30 at halftime and never got closer than five in the second half.

"We're still in the process of getting to be a good team," Beavers coach Craig Robinson said. "To watch us put it all together, albeit with some quirks here and there, it was really a fun game to watch from a coaching standpoint."

Robinson said his team drew inspiration from last week's 88-83 loss at home to California in a game the Beavers led 45-35 at halftime.

"I was able to point to that at halftime of this game," Robinson said. "You can't blow these opportunities. We'd been talking about that all way, that you don't get these opportunities very often.

"But you know what the centerpiece of the halftime talk was? Sticking to the game plan. I mean, if I've said that once this week, I've said it 40 times."

Defense was a key throughout for the Beavers, who did a particularly nice job of keeping Oregon's Mike Moser and Joseph Young from taking over the game.

Young, who came into the game averaging a team-high 18.8 points, matched his season low with five points on 2-of-9 shooting from the field. Moser, who entered averaging 14.6, finished with eight points on 3-of-15 shooting.

For the game, the Ducks made 25 of 66 shots, including 4 of 19 from 3-point range.

"Offensively, the first half we had a bunch of guys just trying to do it on their own," Oregon coach Dana Altman said. "Ball movement was not very good and we took a lot of bad shots and got ourselves down."

Oregon State twice led by as many as 16 points in the first half, the second time at 30-14 when Nelson made two free throws.

The Ducks rallied behind Amardi, Calliste, and Ben Carter as they outscored the Beavers 16-7 over the closing 7:49 of the half to pull within 37-30 at the break.

After Devon Collier converted a three-point play to push the Beavers lead to 63-50 midway through the second half, Oregon went on a 16-8 run capped by a pair of Elgin Cook free throws that made it 71-66 with 2:09 to play, but that was as close as the Ducks could get.

Oregon State made 7 of 10 free throws in the final 52 seconds - three each for Nelson and Moreland - to seal the victory

Angus Brandt finished with 14 points and Hallice Cooke added 10 points and five assists for the Beavers, who made 23 of 51 shots, including 7 of 13 from beyond the arc. OSU also had a 42-34 edge in rebounds and had eight blocked shots to Oregon's two.

"It shows that we're making progress," Brandt said. "We're learning from our mistakes. We're a team that is trying our hardest to be the best we can be. I think if you make comparisons from this year to last year, or this week to last week, you can really see it."

Carter was the only other player to score in double figures (with 11) for the Ducks.

"We're going to bounce back," Ducks guard Johnathan Loyd said. "We're going to take it to the practice floor and try to work it out."

The Ducks opened the season with 13 consecutive wins and climbed as high as No. 10 in The Associated Press poll before consecutive losses to Colorado, California and Stanford dropped them from the poll.

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