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It took the NFL years to come around on the 2-point conversion, which can be a pass or run play from the 2-yard line - and under Goodell’s apparent preference, could be worth one point if the kick is eliminated. The 2-pointer existed in the old AFL from 1960-69, and college football has had it since 1958.

But it was defeated several times in NFL owners’ votes before it passed in 1994 as part of a package of changes to help the offenses.

YEA AND NAY

Coaches will hate any changes, particularly ones that would mean more decisions for them to make. They so rarely go for the 2-pointers until the fourth quarter, and are reluctant to do so then because, well, there’s nothing automatic about those attempts. Indeed, less than half (33 of 69) worked in 2013.

“I will say this: Since 2000, I believe, over 99 percent of the extra points are made,” Falcons coach Mike Smith said. “It’s almost a given that it is going to be made. I’m sure that the competition committee will address it. As a coach you have to play how the rules are.”

Short-yardage backs such as All-Pro fullback Mike Tolbert of Carolina shouldn’t mind the elimination of PAT kicks. Nor should running quarterbacks such as Russell Wilson, Colin Kaepernick and Cam Newton, whose improvisational skills would be a huge advantage.

Kickers? They probably will shrug and practice their field goals - which is what they normally do regarding extra points anyway.

WHO STAYS, AND WHY

Rosters would get slight revamping, with teams likely keeping at least one power back active every week and having two on the roster. Often, those guys also play on special teams, so their presence wouldn’t throw a lineup out of whack.

PRACTICE WON’T MAKE PERFECT

Teams would work even more on their short-yardage packages, beginning in training camp. They would use their PAT offenses in other situations on the field in games, too.

While going for a fourth-and-2 near midfield is less rare than it once was, it might become all the more common when coaches know the more times they attempt such plays, the more seasoned their players will be when trying for the extra points.

WILL IT HAPPEN?

It’s impossible to gauge the owners’ thinking, and a three-quarters majority is needed to pass any rules changes.

“I know a lot of times when we’re at owner meetings, those things are brought up, and it’s great when you’re in those meetings because you hear all the different opinions that are brought up with that,” Jaguars coach Gus Bradley said. “I’m sure there will be discussions about that. I’m excited about hearing all those.”

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