- Associated Press - Tuesday, January 21, 2014
Police search for motive in deadly Purdue shooting

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) - A routine day of classes was pierced by the sounds of gunfire, fire alarms and screams when a Purdue University student entered a basement classroom and shot and killed a fellow senior engineering student from Wisconsin, whom a former teacher described as having a “brilliant mind.”

Police haven’t determined why Cody Cousins, 23, shot Andrew Boldt, a 21-year-old teaching assistant from West Bend, Wis., inside the school’s Electrical Engineering Building about noon Tuesday.

Purdue Police Chief John Cox said witnesses believed the shooting was “an intentional act” but said there was no immediate indication Cousins and Boldt had past troubles.

No one else was injured, and Cousins is being held at the Tippecanoe County Jail on a preliminary charge of murder.

The shooting at the school about 60 miles northwest of Indianapolis prompted Purdue President Mitch Daniels to cut short a weeklong university trip to Colombia and cancel classes Tuesday and Wednesday.

“Violent crime, whenever and wherever it occurs, shocks our conscience and incites our rage. When it happens in our home, to a family member - and as a Boilermaker Andrew Boldt was family to us - those emotions are more powerful still,” Daniels said in a statement read Tuesday night at a campus vigil, which was attended by hundreds.

University officials praised the police response, but the shooting left many students jittery.

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Wis. teacher remembers Purdue victim as brilliant

MILWAUKEE (AP) - A teacher at a Milwaukee high school says she was devastated to learn that her former student has been shot and killed at Purdue University.

Andrew Boldt graduated from Marquette University High School in 2010. The 21-year-old was killed Tuesday, and a suspect is in custody.

Boldt’s high school calculus teacher remembers him as a brilliant mathematician who was a role model to his classmates.

Jean Morrell says Boldt was a high-level thinker who was so impassioned about his work that he often stayed after class to talk about math and robotics.

She says he was a “phenomenal young man” with a great mind and an equally great heart. She says she’s sad he won’t get an opportunity to make his contribution to the world.

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