- Associated Press - Thursday, January 23, 2014

With the red carpets, limousines and non-stop media glare, Brad Jacobs is discovering just what it means to be the top curler in Canada.

After a breakthrough year in 2013 in which his rink became Canadian champion before romping through the Olympic trials, Jacobs heads to the Sochi Games as the big favorite for the gold medal.

And be sure of one thing - curling-mad Canada expects gold.

“We have a special team right now,” Jacobs told The Associated Press, “and we really feel we are just getting started.”


Canada treats its curlers like royalty. After qualifying for the Olympics, Jacobs flew home to Ontario to be greeted by hundreds of cheering fans decked in Team Canada clothing at the airport. A limousine then took the team to its local curling club, where people had lined the streets to welcome them home. A few more hundred fans were in the rink.

At the Canadian Olympic Committee’s send-off party this month, the curlers were given the red-carpet treatment. The autograph lines were huge.

“I imagine if we win the Olympics, the celebrations at home will be 10 times greater,” said Jacobs, who is seeking to win Canada’s third straight men’s curling gold at the Olympics.

There are nine teams looking to stop the Canadians from completing the hat trick.

Norway, the 2010 finalist and famous across the world for wearing funky pants since those Vancouver Games, should again challenge. Sweden, the reigning world champion, is seeking its first men’s Olympic curling medal and to emulate the success of the country’s women’s team, which won gold in 2006 and 2010.

Britain, Denmark, China, Switzerland, Russia, the United States and Germany complete the lineup.

Here are five things to know about the men’s curling tournament:

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A FAMILY AFFAIR

Jacobs has spent Christmases and vacations with cousins Ryan and E.J. Harnden. Now, he’ll try to win Olympic gold with them.

Since 2008, Team Jacobs has contained three members of the same family, who all hail from Sault Ste. Marie in northern Ontario. No wonder there’s such a good camaraderie in the rink during matches.

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