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State District Judge R.H. Wallace will hear arguments as the husband of Marlise Munoz seeks to remove her from life support. Munoz remains connected to machines in John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth.

Erick Munoz of Haltom City said his wife, a fellow paramedic, clearly stated to him before he found her unconscious on Nov. 26: If she ever fell into this condition, she was not to be kept alive.

Hospital officials, however, say they’re bound by a state law that prohibits the withdrawal of treatment from a pregnant patient. Several experts interviewed by The Associated Press have said the hospital is misapplying the law.

The case has raised questions about end-of-life care and whether a pregnant woman who is considered legally and medically dead should be kept on life support for the sake of a fetus. It also has gripped the attention of groups on both sides of the abortion debate, with anti-abortion groups arguing Munoz’s fetus deserves a chance to be born.

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20 years old, FDA is remaking the nutrition facts panel on the backs of food packages

WASHINGTON (AP) - After 20 years, the nutrition facts label on the back of food packages is getting a makeover.

Knowledge about nutrition has evolved since the early 1990s, and the Food and Drug Administration says the labels need to reflect that.

Nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list for label changes.

The number of calories should be more prominent, they say, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included. They also want more clarity on serving sizes.

“There’s a feeling that nutrition labels haven’t been as effective as they should be,” says Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “When you look at the label, there are roughly two dozen numbers of substances that people aren’t intuitively familiar with.”

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Iowa, NH would retain presidential influence in new GOP rules that shorten primary process

WASHINGTON (AP) - Iowa and New Hampshire would retain their coveted spots atop the presidential primary calendar, according to new rules set to be approved by Republican leaders that could reshape the 2016 presidential election.

South Carolina and Nevada would also secure top spots, as they have in the past, as part of a larger plan that would significantly shorten the GOP’s presidential selection process.

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