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2014: Friday’s report says 100,000 of the smoking-caused deaths over the past 20 years were of babies who died of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, or complications from prematurity, low birth weight or other conditions related to parents’ smoking. And it adds cleft palate birth defects to that list of smoking risks to babies.

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1964: The more you smoke, the bigger the risk of death.

2014: Smokers are estimated to shorten their lives by more than a decade. But stopping can lower that risk; sooner is better.

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1964: That first report focused mostly on lung effects and couldn’t prove whether certain other illnesses were caused by smoking.

2014: Doctors now know that smoking impacts nearly every organ of the body, and Friday’s report says medical care for smoking-caused illnesses is costing the country more than $130 billion a year. Add to that lost productivity of more than $150 billion a year.

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1964: Cigarettes were the major concern. “The habitual use of tobacco is related primarily to psychological and social drives, reinforced and perpetuated by pharmacological (drug) actions of nicotine.”

2014: “The tobacco industry continues to introduce and market new products that establish and maintain nicotine addiction,” Friday’s report says. The percentage of middle and high school students who use electronic or e-cigarettes more than doubled between 2011 and 2012.

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1964: That first report called for “remedial actions” to reduce smoking. Warning labels on cigarette packaging started appearing a year later.

2014: With warnings now everywhere, Friday’s report says, “We know that increasing the cost of cigarettes is one of the most powerful interventions we can make.” In 2012, the average price of a pack of cigarettes was $6, largely reflecting an increase in state and federal taxes. For every 10 percent increase in the price, there’s a 4 percent drop in smoking.