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“The issue of fundamental importance in this case is the respect for the right of access to protection provided by our consulates to Mexicans abroad,” Euclides Del Moral Arbona, a director in the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs, told reporters outside the prison.

Gaddis, who had been on the force for two years, was driving Tamayo and another man away from a robbery scene when evidence showed the officer was shot three times in the head and neck with a pistol Tamayo had concealed in his pants. The car crashed, and Tamayo fled on foot but was captured a few blocks away, still in handcuffs, carrying the robbery victim’s watch and wearing the victim’s necklace.

Mexican officials and Tamayo’s attorneys contend he was protected under a provision of the 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. Legal assistance guaranteed under that treaty could have uncovered evidence to contest the capital murder charge or provide evidence to keep Tamayo off death row, they said.

Records show the consulate became involved or aware of the case just as his trial was to begin.

Secretary of State John Kerry previously asked Abbott to delay Tamayo’s punishment, saying it “could impact the way American citizens are treated in other countries.” The State Department repeated that stance earlier Wednesday but had no immediate comment following the execution.

Another of Gaddis‘ brothers, Gary, said it was “unfortunate this has become a political event.”

“But we’re here to remind the public who the true victim is in this crime and to warn the public that John Kerry has no right to try to change the locks of the Supreme Court and turn the keys over to the international community,” he said.

Tamayo was in the U.S. illegally and had a criminal record in California, where he had served time for robbery and was paroled, according to prison records.

At least two other inmates in circumstances similar to Tamayo’s were executed in Texas in recent years.

He was among more than four dozen Mexican nationals awaiting execution in the U.S. in 2004 when the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands, ruled they hadn’t been advised properly of their consular rights.

The Supreme Court subsequently said hearings urged by the international court in those inmates’ cases could be mandated only if Congress implemented legislation to do so. That legislation has not been passed.