Murder trial of Missouri woman delayed 1 month

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CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - A judge postponed the trial of a Missouri woman accused of killing her husband and dumping his body in a mine in the mid-1970s.

Alice Uden, 74, had been scheduled for a Feb. 3 jury trial. Her attorney, Donald Miller, told a judge that he had another trial scheduled for that day.

“Additionally, much of the evidence and witnesses from 1974, the date of the alleged act in this case, have been difficult to locate,” Miller wrote in his motion to Laramie County District Judge Steven Sharpe.

Sharpe granted the request Wednesday and postponed the first-degree murder trial until March 4. Uden remained jailed on $250,000 bond.

Authorities have accused Uden and her current husband, Gerald Uden, 71, of separate murders in Wyoming more than 30 years ago. Police arrested the Chadwick, Mo., couple in Missouri in September.

Prosecutors have not linked the two cases.

Alice Uden is accused of shooting Ronald Holtz, 25, with a rifle in late 1974 or early 1975. Authorities recovered Holtz’s remains last summer from 40 feet down an old, vertical mine shaft in southeast Wyoming.

An affidavit filed in the case says an informant told investigators that Uden once acknowledged shooting Holtz with a rifle as he slept and dumping his body in the mine on the Remount Ranch.

Uden has pleaded not guilty. She used to be a caretaker at the small ranch in the high country between Cheyenne and Laramie.

Holtz’s skull had a .22-caliber bullet in it, investigators say.

Gerald Uden pleaded guilty in November to murder charges in the killing of his ex-wife and her two children in central Wyoming in 1980, by which time he was married to Alice Uden. He told a courtroom he shot Virginia Uden, 32, and her two sons, Richard Uden, 11, and Reagan Uden, 10, with a rifle and dumped their bodies in a mine.

He said he later recovered the bodies and sunk them in Fremont Lake near Pinedale. At 600 feet deep, Fremont Lake is one of the deepest lakes in the U.S.

Investigators say they might search the lake for the bodies this spring.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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