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Noah Powell, a 16-year-old junior, said the shooting happened in a school counselor’s office. Powell said he was in a nearby office and heard the struggle and shots but didn’t see the 17-year-old or know who he was.

Kealii Akiona-Soares, a junior, was in a social studies class when he heard a faint shot at about 8:20 a.m.

Then a school bell sounded and students were kept in their classrooms, the 17-year-old said. He said his class continued with a politics lesson, and everyone kept mostly calm.

“I guess it happens a lot in mainland schools, so it’s not surprising,” Akiona-Soares said.

Carolyn Richardson was among the parents who rushed to Roosevelt after word of the shooting spread.

“This is really freaking me out,” she said.

Richardson learned of the shooting around 9 a.m. through a message from her son CarDarow.

The sophomore texted her that he heard shots had been fired but that he was all right. Richardson then used her cellphone to video chat with her son, screaming: “I gotta hear your voice!”

Faith Kalamau said she went to the school as soon as she got an automated call saying the campus was on lockdown.

“I’m very worried,” she said. “I heard on the news there were some people shot.”

Kalamau eventually reunited with her son, freshman Kahaku King, but she said officials took too long to provide details about what happened.

“I was frustrated,” she said. “I thought maybe more information should have been told to the parents or at least to the media. This is the first time I’ve been in this situation.”

School was let out at about 10 a.m., and a steady stream of students filed off the campus, near the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific known as Punchbowl. Classes were to resume Wednesday.

“Incidents like this are very rare in Hawaii; however, our partnership with the Honolulu Police Department on safety drills played a major role in the success of today’s lockdown,” Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi said. She commended staff and students for following safety protocols and thanked parents for their patience and understanding.

Hawaii is one of 12 states that have not had someone enter a campus with the intent to shoot, state Education Department officials said.

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