- The Washington Times - Monday, July 28, 2014

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

The Washington Redskins are not scheduled to play the St. Louis Rams in the preseason or regular season, and that means I won’t get to see Michael Sam strut his stuff at FedEx Field.

No worries here, but I do have concerns about the roads less traveled.

There appears to be a secret list of these roadways.

A list of PC unspeakables that determine whether the Thought Police will give you a nod and open the gates or whether the Thought Police will roll out the list and ask you to step out of line while pointing toward the pearlized gates.

It seems as though on more occasions than not nowadays people should be permitted to say, “Oops, my bad” or “That’s not what I meant,” and those in opposition be done with it.

Exhibit No. 1: A white TV reporter mistakenly tried to take a black cop killer and the remarks made by his widow and connect them to black kids not being raised by their fathers and anti-cop sentiments.

What a leap!

The reporter fell off the cliff, while his supporters overplayed their hands by rehashing stats about out-of-wedlock black babies and kids with no fathers.

What’s worse, the white reporter has become the news story, although he shouldn’t be — not when two lives are lost.

Exhibit No. 2: While the media have a race-card field day with that story, Stephen A. Smith, one of the most informed and articulate sports commentators on the planet, stepped into a big pile of PC boo-boo Monday after carrying out his job on ESPN’s “First Take” on Friday.

One of the topics was Ray Rice, the Baltimore Ravens’ running back who is suspended for two games because of domestic violence.

Well, Mr. Smith made a connection between female provocateurs and the act of abuse, and the PC alarms immediately went off. On Monday, he was apologizing.

Really?

Domestic violence is the exclusive domain of men?

The Thought Police don’t think women commit it, too?

Abusers are never provoked?

Perhaps we should remember that when a married lesbian levels allegations or files for divorce on the grounds of mental, emotional or physical cruelty. Or the abuser or accuser wants to use leave from work.

Exhibit No. 3: And, as we continue along these one-way streets that are not paved with good intentions, leave Tony Dungy alone.

When asked recently about his philosophy on the draft and player personnel issues, all the man said was: “I wouldn’t have taken him. Not because I don’t believe Michael Sam should have a chance to play, but I wouldn’t want to deal with all of it.

“It’s not going to be totally smooth. Things will happen.”

Coach spoke the truth.

If a player is accused of domestic abuse, substance abuse, driving under the influence or any other crime, the player’s issue becomes a distraction.

Consider Pete Rose, Kobe Bryant, Tiger Woods, and non-players Marv Albert, Rush Limbaugh and Donald Sterling, to name a few.

Indeed, there are countless others in the entertainment industry, including Rosie O’Donnell, Paula Deen and the sexy-handsome Isaiah Washington, whose comments became distractions.

Guns, the N-word and the “homophobe thing.”

The “homophobe thing” became a distraction when Michael Sam smooching with his sweetie provoked a distraction.

Will NFL wives, kids and wannabes witness more behind the scenes?

If gender and race have nothing to do with a thing, then it has n-o-t-h-i-n-g to do with a thing.

And as for News 12 New Jersey reporter Sean Bergin, let’s hope he now knows that anti-cop “mentality” isn’t a black thing.

At 49 years old, he should know better.

Deborah Simmons can be reached at dsimmons@washingtontimes.com.

Copyright © 2016 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide