- Associated Press - Wednesday, July 30, 2014

DETROIT (AP) - Joakim Soria said it might have been the worst outing of his career.

Not a good way to endear himself to his new fans.

Soria retired only one of the seven batters he faced, and the Detroit Tigers allowed seven runs in the seventh inning in an 11-4 loss to the Chicago White Sox on Tuesday night. Soria was pitching at home for the first time since the Tigers acquired the reliever in a trade with Texas.

“There’s a lot going on in your head when you get traded, but it doesn’t impact what you do on the mound,” Soria said. “I was just terrible out there today.”

Jose Abreu and Adam Dunn hit consecutive home runs in the seventh. Chicago sent 12 batters to the plate in the inning and broke the game open against Anibal Sanchez (7-5) and Soria. Alexei Ramirez added a three-run double during the rally.

Jose Quintana (6-7) allowed two runs and nine hits in six innings.

Detroit made three errors, including two in that seventh inning.

With men on first and second and one out in the seventh, Tyler Flowers singled to left, and left fielder Rajai Davis’ error allowed a run to score from second. That gave Chicago a 3-2 lead.

Soria replaced Sanchez, and after Adam Eaton’s single loaded the bases, Ramirez doubled to make it 6-2. Abreu followed with a two-run homer, his major league-leading 31st of the year. Dunn’s solo shot made it 9-2.

“That was probably the worst outing of my career,” Soria said. “You want to make a good impression on the fans and your new team, and then that happens. No matter what pitch I threw, they were right on it. I felt fine, but I missed some over the middle, and they hit all of them.”

Sanchez allowed five runs - four earned - and six hits in 6 1-3 innings. He struck out six and walked two.

SLUMPING AGAIN

The Tigers still lead the AL Central by five games over Kansas City, but they’ve lost four in a row. This is their fourth losing streak of at least four games this season.

The White Sox are now seven games out of first.

QUINTANA SHARP

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