- Associated Press - Tuesday, June 10, 2014

CINCINNATI (AP) - Andy Dalton kept the offense in the huddle for more than a few seconds.

Coordinator Hue Jackson wasn’t happy.

“C’mon guys, get ‘em in and out!” Jackson yelled from the sideline, his arms crossed in a show of disapproval. “Let’s go!”

The Bengals’ offense has a few new features this season under Jackson, and the most noticeable involves speed. Cincinnati no longer has a low gear when it comes to getting lined up and snapping the ball.

There’s only fast and faster.

The up-tempo approach was on display Tuesday during the first workout of minicamp. Jackson, who took over as offensive coordinator when Jay Gruden was hired as Washington’s head coach, wants to see the Bengals develop a more consistent running game. He’s added a few new touches, such as more shifting before plays.

And there’s that constant attention to the play clock.

It’s essentially the same offense run at a different speed.

“It’s an adjustment,” offensive lineman Andrew Whitworth said. “You start getting it where guys are playing harder and faster, and then you have to be able to do it over a long period of time, all of the time. All those things tie in.

“As this game gets faster and sped up, guys are going to have to prepare the right way. To play that style, you have to prepare yourself.”

They started getting accustomed to it during voluntary offseason workouts. The entire offense was together on Tuesday for the first day of the mandatory minicamp, getting a better feel for how the new approach translates into running plays.

The huddles go quicker. The receivers run to their spots before the ball is snapped. The quarterbacks get rid of the ball quickly.

It takes more energy and concentration to go at that pace.

“You definitely feel it,” receiver Marvin Jones said. “When you keep pushing it and make that second-nature, it gets easy. We’re at the point now where we just have to keep pushing.”

The Bengals lost both coordinators from a team that made the playoffs for the third season in a row, only to lose the opening game for the third straight time. Cincinnati hasn’t won a playoff game since the 1990 season, tied for the sixth-longest streak of futility in NFL history.

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