- Associated Press - Tuesday, June 10, 2014
6 Kentucky counties to face post-election audits

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) - Attorney General Jack Conway will take a closer look at election results in six Kentucky counties for audits following the May 20 primary elections.

State law requires the attorney general to randomly select six counties for an audit within 20 days of each election. Conway selected Meade, Allen, Clark, Warren, Breathitt and Russell counties during a public drawing on Monday.

The state election fraud hotline received 205 calls for the May 20 primary elections. Fifteen calls came from Breathitt County, the most of any county in the state.

Conway noted auditors did not find anything wrong with the six counties audited in the previous election. But he said tips to the election hotline resulted in the conviction of three people in Floyd County.


Study: Supervised inmates less likely to re-offend

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - An independent study has found that inmates released early under a new state law are less likely to re-offend.

The Courier-Journal (http://cjky.it/1pv1rm9) reports the study by the nonprofit Pew Charitable Trusts is the first to quantitatively measure how successful the law has been.

The measure took effect in 2012. It is aimed at saving $420 million over 10 years by decreasing the number of prisoners in part by releasing some early under supervision.

The Pew study tracked some of the first prisoners released and found that they were 30 percent less likely to commit new crimes compared to inmates released in previous years with no supervision.

“It’s very exciting to see a state use data and research to drive policy, get beyond partisan posturing, and have such great initial results,” said Adam Gelb, director of Pew’s Public Safety Performance Project. “The Kentucky experience is going to resonate loudly around the country for policy makers interested in more effective, less expensive ways to handle offenders.”

Rep. John Tilley, D-Hopkinsville, who lead the task force that composed the legislation, said it isn’t easy to measure the overall success of the reforms. He said municipalities have saved about $40 million from efforts to reduce inmates at jails.


Somerset to start selling gasoline

SOMERSET, Ky. (AP) - Officials in Somerset say they expect the city to start selling gasoline to the public in a couple of weeks.

Economic development business coordinator George Wilson told The Commonwealth Journal (http://bit.ly/1kZOUlf) that the city has ordered the equipment it needs. He says it should arrive in the next couple of weeks and will take a few days to set up.

City officials decided to start offering gas to the public after getting complaints about high fuel prices in the area.

Wilson says the city plans to purchase the gas from Somerset-based Continental Refining Company and prices will be based on an average of how much cities within a 50-miles radius are charging.

Mayor Eddie Girdler has said the city’s gas would cost less than what’s currently offered at stations around town.

Wilson says the setup will be simple.


Brad Paisley on patriotism: Support our soldiers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - While it’s true patriotism means different things to different people in the U.S., Brad Paisley thinks we can all agree on one aspect: Military personnel should be treated with respect.

This belief spurred two recent actions: Paisley joined President Barack Obama on a trip to Afghanistan to perform for troops and took a moment recently to mock Westboro Baptist Church protesters outside a concert in Kansas. Members of that Topeka, Kansas, church sometimes conduct anti-gay demonstrations at military funerals in opposition to government policies.

“My patriotism starts there,” Paisley said in an interview before performing at the CMA Music Festival on Sunday night. “We’re talking about, I think everyone can agree - except maybe Westboro Baptist - on the fact our soldiers are our most important, the most amazing people that we’ve had.”

Paisley, who has a new singing contest show, “Rising Star,” that begins this month and a new album due in August, traveled to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan with Obama on May 25. The experience was still fresh when the son of a veteran encountered protesters outside his show June 1.

The 41-year-old West Virginia native took a selfie while making a face with protesters in the background and posted it to Instagram with a mildly profane caption that mocked the church. Paisley says it’s a topic he spends time thinking about and wrote a new song, “American Flag on the Moon,” that deals with the topic of patriotism for the new album, “Moonshine in the Trunk.”

“I feel like I’m one of those people that defies category,” Paisley said. “I’m all over the map in a lot of ways, but I feel like being on a journey of trying to figure out how to make this country better is a healthy thing and something I like to look into. I don’t know any answers to it. But, you know, sort of daily it’s easy to look at something and say here’s what you should be doing. It’s harder and more of my approach to look at something and say, ‘OK, what are both sides.’”

Copyright © 2016 The Washington Times, LLC.

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