You are currently viewing the printable version of this article, to return to the normal page, please click here.

Baby’s first train ride? Bride defends dragging 1-month-old down aisle

- The Washington Times - Tuesday, June 3, 2014

A Tennessee woman is defending a photo she posted on Facebook that showed her wedding dress with a 1-month-old baby tied to the train that she apparently dragged down the aisle as part of the ceremony.

Shona Carter-Brooks, of Jackson, Tennessee, secured her 1-month-old daughter to the train of her wedding dress and dragged her down the aisle at the Elam Baptist Church in Ripley, Tennessee, last weekend, the New York Daily News reported.

No video from the wedding has been released, so it's not clear how long the baby was tied to the dress or how far she was dragged, the Daily News reported.

The bride fired back at the wave of negative criticism her family has received since the photo went viral.

"FB family & friends we are outstanding! See we not weary in well doing, for in due season this too shall pass!" she wrote Friday. "We rejoicing for we're too driven to be drowned, victorious to be defeated, and content for God is able! We love you all for your support, love, and encouraging words.

"The answer is we do what we want, when we want long as Jesus on our side everything worked out fine and gone continue to be fine," she wrote. "Most important while y'all got ya feelings in us we had our hearts in Christ which covers all!! So keep ya mouths running for it was just that."

A Facebook friend who claimed to have attended the ceremony also defended the couple.

"Shona and Johnathan Brooks your wedding was super perfect from the groom and his men and you and your diva's baby you rock the gown and the princess tagging behind you it brought tears to my eyes," wrote Pamela Stone, the Daily Mail reported.

"Regardless of anybody else dream your's came true. I loved it and thank you for inviting me," she said.

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.