- Associated Press - Friday, June 6, 2014
Paul weighing dual run for White House, Senate

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul says a state law preventing candidates from having their names appear more than once on the ballot won’t deter him from staging dual campaigns for Senate re-election and president - if he decides to make a bid for the White House in 2016.

Paul told The Associated Press on Thursday he’s still discussing with his family on whether to enter the presidential race.

But he insisted the Kentucky ballot law won’t be an obstacle. The Republican with significant tea party support kept open the option of mounting a court challenge seeking to have his name on the Kentucky ballot for both races.

Legislation aimed at letting Paul run for both offices passed the GOP-led state Senate this year, but died in the Democratic-run House.

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Few certainties in calculating Triple Crown value

NEW YORK (AP) - California Chrome’s bid for the Triple Crown on Saturday is likely to boost TV ratings and, if he wins, create a star for a sport that could badly use one.

It will be a bonanza for the horse’s owners, although their payoff will be limited by Chrome’s humble parents and the racing industry’s delicate health.

Racing insiders say that if California Chrome becomes the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years, his breeding value is likely to be between $15 million and $20 million. That’s a stunning return for owners who paid $8,000 for the horse’s mare and another $2,500 to breed her to a stallion with a mediocre racing record.

The horse could bring in millions more in sponsorships and book and movie deals. Shoe company Skechers just announced it will put its brand on California Chrome caps, clothes and horse blankets - financial terms weren’t disclosed - and more deals are sure to follow if Chrome wins Saturday.

The payoff, however, might fall short of expectations set by Chrome’s team. Before the colt won the Kentucky Derby, his owners said they rejected a $6 million offer for a 51 percent share in the horse. After he won the Preakness, his trainer declared that he was worth $30 million.

Breeders and others in the thoroughbred industry say that’s too high given what they consider Chrome’s modest pedigree. He is no Kentucky blueblood. His underdog identity - born in California, schooled by a 77-year-old trainer, owned by seemingly regular guys who call their business Dumb Ass Partners - makes him a favorite of racing fans, but fails to excite the professionals whose job is to put a price on horse flesh.

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Iraqi goes from translator for US Army to soldier

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