AP-Washington News Coverage,ADVISORY

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Washington state at 1 a.m.

The Seattle bureau can be reached at (800) 552-7694 or (206) 682-1812. The photo supervisor is at (206) 682-4801 or (800) 552-7694.

For questions on stories from Olympia, call (360) 753-7222. For questions on Spokane-area stories, call Correspondent Nicholas Geranios at (800) 824-4928 or (509) 624-1258.

Please do not give out these phone numbers or email addresses to members of the general public.

AP stories, along with the photos that accompany them, can also be obtained from http://www.apexchange.com Reruns are also available from the Service Desk (800) 838-4616.

Please submit your best stories via email to apseattle@ap.org. Stories should be in plain text format.

HANFORD TANKS

SPOKANE - There are “significant construction flaws” in some newer, double-walled storage tanks at Washington state’s Hanford nuclear waste complex, which could lead to additional leaks, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. Those tanks hold some of the worst radioactive waste at the nation’s most contaminated nuclear site. By Nicholas K. Geranios. SENT: 900 words, photos.

Seattle TUNNEL

SEATTLE - A machine that had been digging a highway tunnel underneath Seattle likely won’t begin working again for another six months, an official with the contractor says. But Seattle Tunnel Partners project manager Chris Dixon said that estimate is “slightly optimistic.” By Manuel Valdes. SENT: 350 words, AP Photos by Ted Warren

COLUMBIA DAM CRACK

EPHRATA - A 65-foot-long crack in a Columbia River dam in central Washington has prompted officials to begin lowering the water level by 20 feet so inspectors can get a better idea of how serious the damage is. SENT: 370 words.

PEBBLE MINE-EPA

JUNEAU, Alaska - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is taking the first steps toward possibly restricting or even prohibiting development of a massive gold-and-copper prospect near the headwaters of a world-premier sockeye salmon fishery in southwest Alaska. The decision follows release of an EPA report in January that found large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay watershed posed significant risk to salmon and could adversely affect Alaska Natives in the region, whose culture is built around salmon. By Becky Bohrer. SENT: 570 words.

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