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The sequence is important for the defense because, if it can prove that Pistorius called security first, it could support the contention that he was seeking help as quickly as possible.

The guard, Pieter Baba, had testified Friday that he called Pistorius and was told “everything is fine” on the telephone. Baba said Pistorius then called him back moments later, didn’t speak, was crying and the second call then ended.

Baba said he was responding to neighbors’ reports of gunshots coming from Pistorius‘ home after 3 a.m. on Valentine’s Day last year. He drove with a fellow guard to Pistorius‘ villa and made the call from outside the house.

Baba’s statement that he called Pistorius first could back the prosecution’s case that the killing was premeditated, and that Pistorius was trying, at least initially, to conceal what he had done.

On Monday, however, Roux said call records showed Pistorius called security first, but couldn’t speak because he was “indeed crying.”