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That’s precisely the point economic development officials are trying to make as lawmakers consider restrictions. Government use of the technology is a big driver for industry growth, said Vincent Mikolay at the Utah governor’s economic development office.

Mikolay said unmanned systems are expected to be a billion-dollar industry in the U.S. over the next three years, and if states like Utah can land a portion of that, they’ll see big economic gains.

Legislators in Utah and elsewhere aren’t waiting for judges to determine whether the Fourth Amendment’s constitutional protections against unlawful searches are sufficient to protect citizens, and are instead diving in with specific rules.

In Rhode Island this year, lawmakers are considering legislation that requires law enforcement to hold public hearings before acquiring a drone. They’d need approval from local leaders or the governor, and would need to consult the state attorney general and a judge before using it.

California legislators are considering measures that would require police to obtain a warrant when using drones and notify the public when they intend to use them. It also requires any data collected to be destroyed within six months and bars public agencies from arming the devices.