RI’s 5 things: Memo mistake, constitutional confab

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) - From a sentencing in a double murder to more talk about a possible state constitutional convention, here are five things to know in Rhode Island:

MAN SENTENCED FOR DOUBLE MURDER

Daniel Rodriguez was sentenced Thursday to four life terms plus 50 years in prison after admitting killing his ex-girlfriend and her adult daughter, then kidnapping her 2-year-old son. Rodriguez acknowledged sneaking into the Johnson home of his ex-girlfriend, Evelyn Burgos, 40, on Aug. 11, then confronting and shooting her and her daughter, Vanessa Perez, 25, in a child’s bedroom. He fled with the boy, who was later found wandering alone in a Providence neighborhood. Rodriguez was arrested after his uncle, a Providence police officer, tracked him down.

MEMO MISTAKENLY SENT IN 38 STUDIOS CASE

A legal counsel to Gov. Lincoln Chafee inadvertently turned over a privileged document to Wells Fargo, a defendant in the 38 Studios lawsuit, attorneys for the state’s economic development agency announced Friday. The memorandum was from attorneys advising Chafee in May 2012 about 38 Studios as the company started by ex-Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling was imploding. Wells Fargo is one of 14 defendants in the litigation over the collapse of the company, which received a $75 million loan guarantee from the economic development agency. Attorneys for the agency want all copies of the memo destroyed, but a Wells Fargo attorney says his client is entitled to the document.

SENATE OKS CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION QUESTION

The state Senate voted Wednesday to place a referendum on a state constitutional convention on the fall ballot. The House has not voted on the measure, but it’s a moot point because Secretary of State Ralph Mollis intends to put the question on the ballot if the legislature doesn’t. If voters authorize a convention, 75 locally elected delegates would consider revising the state constitution. Any proposed changes would need voter approval. Rhode Island’s Constitution requires voters to consider holding a convention every decade. The most recent convention was in 1986.

STATE EXPANDS ACCESS TO OVERDOSE ANTIDOTE DRUG

Rhode Island’s health department director has taken emergency steps to address an overdose crisis by making an overdose antidote more widely available, including to law enforcement agencies. The regulations allow for naloxone - also known as Narcan - to be prescribed not only to a person experiencing an overdose or at risk of one but also to relatives and friends in a position to assist. Police departments would be able to obtain and administer Narcan under a standing order from a prescriber. Rhode Island reported 55 accidental overdose deaths this year through March 4, about twice the normal number.

RAIMONDO, TAVERAS PITCH ECONOMIC PLANS

Two Democratic gubernatorial hopefuls unveiled plans to boost workforce development and economic activity. Providence Mayor Angel Taveras on Tuesday announced a proposal to train as many as 3,750 workers over four years using a curriculum developed by the Community College of Rhode Island and businesses. Treasurer Gina Raimondo also called for a greater focus on workforce development and pitched a proposal Monday to create an “innovation institute” focusing on food sciences, marine industries and health sciences. The state’s jobless rate in January was 9.2 percent.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks