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HUMPHRIES: On ‘Cosmos,’ global warming and the big bang theory

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I'm about as much of a real scientist as Al Gore is. The only difference, my theories haven't been debunked in a court of law.

TV's "Cosmos," global warming and the big bang theory (no, I don't mean Sheldon) — here on today's briefing:

There's a new show on TV. Carl Sagan's "Cosmos" is back, you may have seen it. It premiered on 10 Fox networks, and if you want a good idea of just how big the universe is, it's a great show to watch.

In the first episode, the first half of the show was cool. It dealt with how BIG the universe is. It's hard to argue with that! But then, it was confidently declared that all this wonderment above us began with a big bang. All matter, trillions upon trillions upon trillions of planets and stars, were formed from a point no bigger than a single atom.

Here's where I stop and question — all the matter in the entire universe from an atom-size pinpoint? As one of the world's best known physicists would say, "Bazinga!"

Physics or no physics, Einstein or no Einstein, using physicists own definition of the scientific method, when was the last time you observed an explosion creating order, much less something so perfect?

But it's not just that this show and others say that "the big bang and global warming" are settled science, it's the venom in which they attack everyone else who disagrees with them.

The majority of today's religious believers aren't hostile to science. We just think it's tough to contemplate the vast reaches of space without at least wondering if some great hand set things in motion.

But there's a far more serious threat to scientific inquiry nowadays, and that's from the cults of science, like the climate change movement. The Inquisition isn't coming back, and even as critics of the big bang theory, we want to be heard, not shut anybody up.

But you can't say that about the climate change movement. They openly talk about the importance of suspending First Amendment rights to silence people. They've manipulated data, ignored inconvenient results, erased big chunks of history, and supported insane propaganda designed to terrify the public out of asking questions they can't answer.

And they're not the only cult of science out there. Much of our super-sized government is based on the idea that a little group of experts can manage our lives for our own good. Those experts have had a pretty lousy track record — their predictions are always wrong, and their plans don't work. But they cling to their faith in government and try to disguise it as science.

There really aren't many true atheists out there. Everyone believes in something. Nearly 80 percent of the U.S. population is Christian, Jewish or Muslim and believe in the hand of God. People who avoid religion seem to have other kinds of faith they won't give up on, no matter what evidence they see. And those are the people who seem most interested in forcing everyone else to accept their faith.

Evolution breaks every natural law we know — biogenesis, thermodynamics, etc. — and yet science dogmatically clings to it for one reason. Because the only alternative is God.

It's funny, but if we hear a story where a frog suddenly turns into a prince, we know intuitively it's a fairy tale, but if the frog turns into a prince over billions of years, it's science?

My friend, cartoonist Mark Herron, created what could be the REAL story of our creation, because if we didn't start with Adam and Eve, maybe we all come from the great ancestor, Louie the Lump! A link to that "real story" is here:  http://www.michaelpink.com/

I love the Milky Way and the Big Dipper as much as the next guy. I just don't want to be told I have to love ZOTS because that's what everyone else likes. (Do they still have those?)

I'm not against science, I LOVE science! But wise scientists don't exclude the Creator. They embrace Him.

Agree or disagree — comment right here on The Washington Times website because I believe, unlike those who demand the argument is settled, there's a lot to talk about and you have a right to be heard.

Until the next briefing, this is The Rusty Humphries Rebellion.

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