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Kapor Klein says she and her husband share Jackson’s goals and vision of what Silicon Valley should look like, but they choose to employ different tactics to get there.

Jesse Jackson wouldn’t be heading to Hewlett Packard or any of the other big tech companies if they had done their job and accomplished diversity,” she says. “He’s shining a spotlight on one aspect of the growing inequality of this country.”

Villanova University management professor Quinetta Roberson says the lack of diversity, particularly in Silicon Valley, is a problem given the value of diversity in organizations.

Roberson cites research showing that “diversity of thought generates creativity and innovation, and facilitates better problem-solving, both in terms of quantity and quality of solutions.”

“Given that such outcomes are what drives performance in tech companies in the Valley, it is imperative to have such divergent perspectives represented within the body that is doing visioning and strategic directioning for organizations,” says Roberson.

Brooklyn-based technology marketing strategist Rachel Weingarten is frustrated by the lack of diversity in business leadership.

“America pays a lot of lip service to full diversity, and in many ways we’re constantly making great strides, but for women like myself, forming our own companies and entrepreneurship is the only true way to level any playing field -by creating our own,” she says.

In the past, Jackson’s critics have accused him of profiting from similar protest actions. These critics say that after Jackson targeted companies over diversity issues in the financial sector and other industries, some have ended up donating large sums to Jackson’s organizations. In other cases, the targeted companies gave contracts to minority-owned firms that paid Jackson for referrals.

Graves, of Black Enterprise, dismisses such concerns.

“If in the fight to create opportunity, some of the money that these companies would contribute to United Way or the American Heart Association happens to go to (Jackson‘s) Rainbow Coalition, I’m more than OK with that,” he says.

“That’s just the fear factor coming from when they see him,” Graves says, “because they know he’s not going to go away.”