- Associated Press - Thursday, March 27, 2014
Baby gorilla born at Milwaukee County Zoo

MILWAUKEE (AP) - The Milwaukee County Zoo is welcoming its first western lowland gorilla born at the zoo since 1992.

The zoo announced Thursday that the baby gorilla, named Kassiu, was born March 19 to 13-year-old mother Naku and 27-year-old father Cassius.

Kassiu is the first offspring of both Naku and Cassius. Zoo officials say both the mother and baby are doing well.

The zoo’s animal care staff is fairly certain the infant is a female but hasn’t had a chance to get a detailed look yet.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (http://bit.ly/1rG5M7Vhttp://bit.ly/1rG5M7V ) reports the baby joins three adult female and three adult male gorillas at the zoo.

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Information from: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, http://www.jsonline.comhttp://www.jsonline.com

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UW-Parkside: Student data may have been exposed

SOMERS, Wis. (AP) - The University of Wisconsin-Parkside says the personal data of thousands of students may have been exposed due to a hacker attack on the school’s server.

The school notified students Thursday. Potentially at risk are the names, addresses, telephone numbers, email addresses and Social Security numbers of students who were admitted or enrolled at the university since fall of 2010.

The Journal Times (http://bit.ly/1jaVKaKhttp://bit.ly/1jaVKaK ) reports the total number of students affected could be as high as 15,000.

Campus Technology Services staff doing routine maintenance discovered earlier this month that computer hackers had installed a virus on a university server.

University officials are notifying students so they can take steps to protect their identity and monitor their credit reports and financial statements.

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Information from: The Journal Times, http://www.journaltimes.comhttp://www.journaltimes.com

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Walker triples cap on payment for casino study

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - Gov. Scott Walker’s administration has agreed to triple to $1.5 million the potential payment to a national law firm hired to help examine whether to allow the Menominee Tribe to open an $800 million casino in Kenosha.

The original contract signed in December capped payments to the Dykema Gossett law firm at $500,000. But an amended contract released Thursday by Walker’s administration raises the cap to $1.5 million.

Walker’s Department of Administration Secretary Mike Huebsch (HIPSH) says the increase in potential payment “reflects the complexity of both the Kenosha casino proposal and its economic impact on Wisconsin.”

Huebsch says raising the cap “ensures we will be able to provide accurate, relevant information about the viability of this project.”

Walker has not said when he will make a decision.

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DOJ responds to sing-along cost-benefit request

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - A state attorney says legislators decided maintaining order in the state Capitol outweighs the costs of enforcing access rules.

Demonstrators have been gathering in the Capitol almost daily since 2011 to sing songs criticizing Republican Gov. Scott Walker. Capitol Police issued hundreds of citations against the singers for gathering without a permit between July 2012 and October 2013, when the crackdown ended.

Dane County Circuit Judge Peter Anderson asked DOJ in January to provide a cost-benefit analysis of pursuing so many citations.

Assistant Deputy Attorney General Dan Lennington responded on Thursday with a letter to Anderson. He didn’t offer any numerical data, saying instead that legislators concluded the benefit of access rules that protect Capitol visitors outweighs enforcement costs and prosecutors have great discretion on what cases to pursue.

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